Want to run Android apps on Windows? Meet Remix OS Player, the latest from Jide Technology.

Remix OS Player virtualizes a desktop version of Android inside of the Windows operating system. Basically, it’s like the Android emulator BlueStacks with one exception: it runs almost any Android app. Here’s how to get started.

What Can I Do With Remix OS Player?

Almost any Android app runs inside of Remix OS. What makes this special? Emulated apps normally run horribly or not at all. Fortunately, Jide’s emulation method functions with great speed and fluidity.

Pokemon Go in Remix OSFor example, games work great. Pokemon Go can work in Remix using a method similar to running Pokemon on Windows. Even many mobile-only programs, like Tinder (good uses for Tinder), can run on the desktop. Also, virtualization provides an additional layer of security since all apps run within a sandboxed environment.

Unfortunately, not everyone can use Remix OS Player because of the relatively high system requirements.

System Requirements

You need the following specifications to run Remix OS Player:

  • Intel processor (Core i5 or better recommended)
  • Windows 7 (64-bit) or newer
  • At least 8 GB of RAM (16 GB recommended)
  • Around 5 GB of free storage drive space
  • Virtualization enabled in BIOS/UEFI (how to enter the BIOS?)

Getting Started With Remix OS Player

Virtualization can do a lot of things. Its most important feature allows operating systems to run instances of other operating systems, like Linux. For example, the Linux OS employs Wine (here’s how to use Wine) when running Windows applications.

Programs like Wine permit apps like Steam to run in Linux.

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Steam on Linux With Wine

Recognizing the importance of virtualization, processor manufacturers implemented it at the hardware level. Intel uses a technology called Intel Virtualization Technology (Intel VT), which dramatically improves the performance of virtualized operating systems. Before running Remix OS Player, you need to enable Intel VT from within your system’s BIOS or UEFI.

We’ve covered the general steps required to enter a BIOS/UEFI, but for the curious, here’s a quick refresher:

  1. Start the computer.
  2. Immediately begin tapping DEL, F1, or F2 (it depends on your computer).
  3. After the BIOS/UEFI loads, locate Intel VT (sometimes referred to as VT-d or VT-x) and change it to Enabled.
  4. Save BIOS/UEFI settings and restart the computer.

After the computer finishes loading, download Remix OS Player and unzip it (I recommend using 7-Zip).
Jide includes both traditional downloads and torrents. You may want to use a torrent client to download Remix OS Player — it’s safer and requires less effort (I recommend using qBittorrent).

Next, start Remix OS Player by running the executable within the unzipped Remix OS Player folder.

Run Remix OS Player ZIP Folder

Configuration

Running Remix OS Player for the first time brings up an emulation configurator. The default choices should work on most systems. However, if you prefer, increasing the screen resolution makes using the emulator much easier — at the cost of reduced performance.

Remix OS Player First Run Configuration

After picking (or leaving the defaults in place) your configuration options, select Start from the center of the emulator window. This runs the emulator for the first time. You’ll see a series of white-text phrases splashed across a black screen — and then the emulator launches into a first-run routine.

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First Run

After Remix OS Player finishes configuring, the user must choose a language. Users can select between English and two dialects of Chinese. If your mother tongue isn’t listed, leave English in place and later choose the correct language from Android’s Settings menu.

Once Remix OS finishes configuring, you’ll see the Remix desktop. It includes desktop features such as a taskbar at the bottom of the screen and a Start menu.

Remix OS Player Desktop

Before diving into Remix, users may want to configure an app store. There are two default stores. The first comes from Jide: Remix Central, which comes equipped with a lot of apps users can’t find in the Play Store. I won’t go into details, but you may want to give it a try. For the sharp eyed: apps with already checked boxes are mostly advertised applications. None of these are malware, but you may — or may not — want to uncheck a few of these.

Remix OS Prechecked Boxes

There are a few tips that users should use in order to get full access to the Google Play Store.

Google Play Activation

Activating Google Play requires little effort. First, click on the Remix OS icon in the lower-left side of the screen. Second, run the Play Store Activator by clicking on it. The activation process just takes a few seconds. After the process completes, you can then run the Google Play Store by clicking on its icon. The icon should show up on the desktop after activation. You’ll need to go through a login process before getting access to Google’s app library.

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Activate Google Play Android

Remix Central

Remix Central is Jide’s official app store. It gives access to a lot of apps not available through Google’s Play Store. Some of the more interesting picks: ad-blockers galore and one of the more shady Android versions of Popcorn Time (the truth about Popcorn Time).

Jide divides their app recommendations into two categories: Popular, Useful, and Entertainment. In general, the featured apps receive recognition in the Google Play Store. Basically, those apps aren’t malware. Select your apps by clicking on them and choose Next.

Remix OS Player Central Entertainment

After you’ve selected your apps, the installer will display a manifest of all software. Scan these to make sure you’ve gotten all the apps that you want. And then select Install from the bottom pane to begin the installation process.

Remix OS Player Central Summary

Is Remix OS Player Worth Checking Out?

If you want to try out Android apps on Windows, it’s definitely worth a try. Sadly, Jide didn’t make a Linux version of Remix OS Player. To the extent of my understanding of the subject, BlueStacks and Android x86 images will run on Linux. Although, if you want Android x86, you might need VirtualBox. If you’re a Linux user, running Remix OS may not be possible.

Have you tried out Remix OS yet? What are your thoughts? Are there any salient functions that I’ve missed? Let us know in the comments!

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